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Schedule of Publication

Society and Politics appears on the following dates:

April 30th

November 30th


Call for Papers


Society and Politics aims at publishing thematic and special issues and for this is seeking prospective guest editors that would be willing to submit proposals for thematic and special issues.

 


 

Pendulum Clocks in the Seventeenth Century Philosophy

 

Invited editor: Filip Buyse

 

According to his first biographer and last student, at the end of his life (when he was already blind), Galileo dictated a drawing of a pendulum clock to his son, Vincenzo. The author of the Dialogue (1632) had discovered that it was not the mass but the length of a pendulum that determines its oscillation time. Based on this concept of isochronism, Christiaan Huygens constructed - in collaboration with his technician - a sophisticated pendulum clock which he patented in 1665. In the same year, the author of Horologium oscillatorium sive de motu pendularium (1673) observed and analyzed the spectacular phenomenon of the synchronization of clocks.
Huygens’ clock was not only constructed to measure time but also to determine longitude at sea. Moreover, this sophisticated device became a leading metaphor for early modern philosophers. This application was linked to a tradition that applied the mechanical analogy in philosophy. However, Huygens’ invention renewed the use of this metaphor completely. Philosophers started to apply the analogy in innovative ways in order, for instance, to clarify the mind/body-problem and the harmony between bodies in the universe.

 

This issue of Societate și Politică (Society and Politics) aims at exploring these applications and related topics by seventeenth century philosophers such as Galileo, Huygens, Comenius, Geulincx, Leibniz, Spinoza and Boyle.

 

Papers no longer than 8.000 words or book reviews no longer than 800 words should be submitted by email to Filip Buyse at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

For the authors guidelines see:

http://socpol.uvvg.ro/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=48&Itemid=53

All papers will go through a process of blind-reviewing. The deadline for submissions is June 1st, 2017.

 


 

Early Modern Intellectual Networks

 

Invited editor: Ovidiu Babeș

 

Intellectual interactions played a major role in shaping modern thought. There are many ways in which the ambition of the advancement of knowledge was carried out in a collaborative way by the prominent Early Modern figures. Theoretical interactions such as written correspondence facilitated the exchange of learning and influenced philosophical ideas arisen in the seventeenth century. This was doubled by an increasing interest in the process of disseminating knowledge that engaged intelligencers and philosophers with different backgrounds and sometimes interested in quite different projects. Such examples are the circles emerged around the figures of Mersenne, Hartlib, or Oldenburg. How do the two interact and in what ways theoretical and practical concerns mingled in the new philosophy?

 

This issue of Societate și Politică (Society and Politics) aims at exploring the relation between these intellectual networks and the advancement of knowledge in any branch of early modern philosophical studies.

 

Societate și Politică welcomes research coming from different fields (history of philosophy, history and philosophy of science, history and philosophy of mathematics, etc.) and strongly encourages cross-disciplinary approaches.

 

Papers no longer than 8.000 words or book reviews no longer than 800 words should be submitted by email to Ovidiu Babeș, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

For the authors guidelines see:

http://socpol.uvvg.ro/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=48&Itemid=53

All papers will go through a process of blind-reviewing. The deadline for submissions is December 15, 2016.

 


Whither United Europe? Competition and Cooperation in the New World Order

 

Invited editors: Cristian Bențe & Irina Ionela Pop

 

 

Since the first European Security Strategy (ESS), A Secure Europe in a Better World, adopted on December 12, 2003, the EU’s strategic environment has changed radically. The Report on the Implementation of the European Security Strategy of December 11, 2008 did not bring significant changes in the EU foreign and security policy. In April 2015, Nathalie Tocci, Special Advisor to the High Representative on the European Security Strategy, emphasized that the world is “more connected, more contested and more complex”. This should lead the Union to reflect more closely on the six components of its external action: a) stronger engagement in the Balkans and towards Turkey; b) preserving and developing the European post-war order; c) crises in North Africa and the Middle East; d) relations with Africa; e) transatlantic partnership and EU-NATO relations; and f) improving cooperation with Asia and an associated renewal of the system of multilateral institutions.

 

Considering the new EU Global Strategy, which will be presented to EU leaders by June 2016, this special issue of Societate și politică (Society and Politics), seeks articles that investigate these strategic challenges and attempt at offering pertinent explanations and solutions.

 

 

Papers no longer than 8.000 words or book reviews no longer than 800 words should be submitted by email to: Cristian Benţe, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , Irina Ionela Pop, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

 

For the authors guidelines see:

http://socpol.uvvg.ro/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=48&Itemid=53

 

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